Magnifying Christ as the Sovereign God of Technology

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In our day and age, we have technophiles, technophobes, and people in the middle. Technophiles are incredibly enthusiastic about technological developments, while technophobes are deathly afraid of them. But the Christian can stand comfortably balanced between the two, because the God of all of this stuff- all our technology, rules over it all.

Technology is a tool, and tools are given to us by God. The first stone Adam used to crack open a coconut was a tool. It was a token of technological advancement. As the centuries have passed, God has given us the resources and abilities to continue advancing our tools. These tools are not inherently good or bad in themselves. However, they can find themselves in the hands of a person doing good or evil, something beneficial or detrimental. They are not new “gods” unless we revere and worship them as such. They are neutral. However, as Doug Wilson points out in Ploductivity, technology is a form of wealth. The Bible describes wealth as a blessing, but a blessing that can easily turn our hearts away from God (Deut. 8:10-20). Therefore we must view our technological tools with grateful suspicion. We should be grateful for the blessing that they are and desire to use them to honor God. But we should be suspicious of our hearts that can quickly turn blessings into a means of forgetting the God who blessed us in the first place.

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Saving Eutychus, Summary & 3 Take-a-Ways

Summary

In Saving Eutychus, Gary Millar and Phil Campbell aim to help preachers “preach in a way that is faithful to the Scripture without being dull” (26). They accomplish this goal by giving the reader several tools to help them communicate the message of a biblical text in a clear and engaging manner. From the outset, they distinguish between being engaging and creative and being cunning and manipulative. The goal of the preacher is be “so truth-driven that we wouldn’t dream of twisting the message to suit our own ends” (28). However, the preacher must try to present the truth in such a way as to maximize its impact (engaging), in a way that connects with people at a deep level. This kind of preaching, they argue, will change the hearts of the people as it clearly communicates the power for change- God’s Word. Millar and Campbell explain ways to clearly communicate God’s Word through giving instruction concerning finding the “bid idea” of the passage, illustrating the obvious, and continually growing in the ability to apply the biblical text. They also give some helpful insight on preaching Christ from the Old Testament, using different aspects of delivery (volume, pace, pitch), and the importance of sermon critique. This book is a simple yet very practical book on preaching.

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Summary & Three Takeaways from “The Supremacy of God in Preaching” by John Piper

In The Supremacy of God in Preaching, John Piper calls preachers to make displaying the glory and majesty of God the ultimate goal of their pulpit ministry, “The goal of preaching is the glory of God in the glad submission of his people” (44). He accomplishes this by presenting the biblical foundation for such a goal (1 Peter 4:10-11, “in order that in everything God may be glorified in Jesus Christ,”) and using Jonathan Edwards as an illustration of such preaching. The rest of the book answers how to preach the supremacy of God. First, Piper encourages preachers to recognize the gravity of preaching and to pursue joy in it. He then considers the ministry of Jonathan Edwards, encouraging pastors to follow his example in keeping God central through intimacy in worship, submitting to God through faith in His sovereignty, making God supreme through ten helpful suggestions on preaching (most impactful noted below). He concludes by looking back over three decades of ministry and considering how he’s grown in his appreciation of Edwards’ view of Christ and Calvin’s resolve to keep preaching “tethered to the Bible.” Near the end of the book, he lists thirty reasons why it is a great thing to be a pastor, a riveting and awe-inspiring list that is sure to stir the heart of anyone who is preparing for the task of shepherding God’s people.

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Reflections on Tim Keller’s ‘Preaching’

Summary

In Preaching, Timothy Keller argues for what makes good expository, Christ-centered, culturally-pointed preaching. In other words, he argues for and describes the type of preaching that is faithful to the biblical text, focused on the main theme of the Bible (Christ), and committed to communicating God’s truth in a way that a particular audience will understand it. Continue reading “Reflections on Tim Keller’s ‘Preaching’”

Cyprian of Carthage on the Church as Family

In the middle of the third century, a bishop named Cyprian presented his understanding of the church as the “family of God” in order to answer two main controversies that were facing ancient Christianity at the time. These two controversies were over what to do with believers who denied the faith under persecution, and whether or not to re-baptize believers who were baptized by church leaders who also “lapsed.”[1] His opponents 180px-Cyprian_von_Karthago2argued that those who caved in under persecution should not be allowed back into the church…ever, and that those who were baptized by leaders who did the same were not genuinely Christian. On the opposite spectrum were those calling for the lapsed to be readmitted to the church without asking any questions.

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The Jordan River and Assurance of Salvation

In part one of this blog, I discussed how the parting of the Red Sea teaches us the ever-important lesson that salvation is of the Lord. If we truly believe this, the second lesson naturally follows: that God will bring our salvation to completion. If salvation is of the Lord, he will complete it. There is nothing we can do to thwart his plan. Let the explanation of this truth through the consideration of the miracle at the Jordan River be of encouragement to our hearts!

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The Red Sea: Salvation is of the Lord

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Two sets of water. Two miracles. Two fundamental lessons on salvation.

The parting of the Red Sea and the Jordan River are much more than neat miracle stories. They are central events in the unfolding drama of redemption that proclaim who God is and the nature of His salvation. In this post, I will discuss one fundamental lesson of salvation revealed in the first of these events.

The Red Sea

Imagine the scene at the Red Sea: God had promised to lead His people out of slavery in Egypt and into land he promised to give Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Through many miraculous signs and wonders, God moved the stubborn heart of Pharaoh to momentarily allow Israel to leave. In dramatic fashion, the people evacuate Egypt, Pharaoh changes his mind and pursues Israel, and Israel seems to be trapped by the impassibility of the Red Sea. Their first thought isn’t to turn to God for help (easy to judge, but unfortunately we often do the same), but to complain and grumble against Moses and declare that they were better off in Egypt (see Exodus 14:10-12). Moses responds, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will work for you today” (Exod. 14:13).

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Putting on the Armor, Chuck Lawless

 

puttingonthearmorBefore reading Putting on the Armor, I must confess that I often viewed the “armor of God” passage in Ephesians 6 as somewhat irrelevant. In a way, I knew it was probably important, but it seemed to be no more than a descriptive metaphor for walking with God, something I could easily skim over and get the point. I remember hearing a small handful of sermons or talks on the subject that seemed to trivialize the description of the armor. These talks of “praying on the armor” or “which piece of the armor are you missing?” trivialized the concepts of the passage so much that it had a negative effect on how I viewed the relevance of the verses. Dr. Lawless’ book has changed my view on the concept of the “armor” by providing me with an accurate view of the passage as a whole, helping me understand each individual piece of armor, and walking me through how to “wear” the armor in everyday life.

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Four Things NOT to Say to Those Who Are Suffering

As Christians, we are called to bear one another’s burdens, especially when we experience suffering. Yet we often do not prepare for these moments and get tongue tied, speak with general spiritual platitudes, or avoid speaking altogether. But we must learn to comfort and encourage each other in suffering, because it is a natural part of life and a supernatural part of God’s plan (see Philippians 1:29). As we help one another, we can be instruments used by God to comfort those in need.

As we seek to speak to those who are suffering, we must avoid saying these four things:

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The Certainty of God vs. The Uncertainty of Wealth

Instruct those who are rich in the present age not to be arrogant or to set their hope on the uncertainty of wealth, but on God who richly provides us with all things to enjoy.” – 1 Timothy 6:17

Have you ever read verses about money and felt that they were unreasonable? Perhaps you’ve thought that to serve God and not money really isn’t even doable. How can we do that when we need money to live, eat, and provide for ourselves and our families? You’ve probably heard the famous verse, “You cannot be slaves of both God and money” (Luke 16:13). If you’re like me, you’ve probably been frustrated with understanding how we apply verses like these.

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